Advance Directives

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An Advance Directive (also known as a Living Will) helps guide medical decision making at the end of life. Advance Directives can have different titles in different states but are legally valid throughout the United States. It is important to execute and sign advance directives that comply with your state’s law as the laws governing Advance Directives vary from state to state.

An Advance Directive allows you to appoint a person you trust as your healthcare agent who is then authorized to make medical decisions on your behalf should you become unable to do so. You don’t have to pick a family member as your health care agent but remember whomever you choose will have the power to make important healthcare treatment decisions, even if other people close to you add pressure for a different decision to be made.

Selection of a healthcare agent.

You should consider picking one or two back-up healthcare agents, in case your first choice isn’t available when needed.  Make certain to inform your chosen person(s) and those close to you so they understand what is most important to you. The conversation is just as important as the Advance Directive document itself. Remember to then give copies to your doctor, friends and/or family members.

Once you execute an Advance Directive it does not expire and it will remain in effect unless you revoke it. We recommend that you review your medical power of attorney every few years as circumstances or your point of view may change in your life.  You are free to revoke or amend an Advance Directive at any given time, as long as you still have decision-making capacity. If you decide to amend or revoke your Advance Directive, be certain to tell your physician and anyone else who has a copy.

At the Law Offices of Lee A. Drizin, our compassionate attorneys have years of experience guiding and assisting people with their Advance Directives.  To discuss your wishes in a private and caring environment, call our office today at (702) 798-4955