Nevada Child Support Laws Get Massive Overhaul

In a shakeup that hasn’t occurred in more than 30 years, Nevada has drastically modified how much people pay for child support. What was once an east straight calculation is now somewhat more complicated. Overall, people who have an obligation to pay support will pay less.

The new rates are as follows:

One Child: 16% of the obligor’s gross monthly income on the first $6,000; an additional 8% on the amount up to $10,000; an additional 4% of any amount greater than $10,000

Two Children: 22% of the obligor’s gross monthly income on the first $6,000; an additional 11% on the amount up to $10,000; an additional 6% of any amount greater than $10,000

Three Children: 26% of the obligor’s gross monthly income on the first $6,000; an additional 13% on the amount up to $10,000; an additional 6% of any amount greater than $10,000

Four Children: 28% of the obligor’s gross monthly income on the first $6,000; an additional 14% on the amount up to $10,000; an additional 7% of any amount greater than $10,000

Additional Children: For each additional child the amount ges up 2% on the first $6000; an additional 1% on the next amount up to $10,000; an additional .5% on the amount greater than $10,000

These new laws go into effect February 2020.

For example if an obligor’s income is $10,000/month, the obligation for two children would be as follows:

Before February 2020: $1,892/month
After February 2020: $1,760/month

Someone earning $5,000 a month would be pay:

Before February 2020: $1,250
After February 2020: $1,100

For more than 23 years, Attorney Ethan Kottler has practiced in the areas of family law, estate planning and guardianship matters representing clients throughout the state of Nevada. Attorney Kottler works at Law Offices of Lee A. Drizin in Las Vegas, NV.

Drizin Law is providing this information for educational purposes only. It should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion as to any specific facts or circumstances. This information is based on general principles of Nevada law at the time it was created and you should be aware laws frequently change. Moreover, the laws affecting you may differ depending on the circumstances. You should consult with a qualified attorney in your own state or jurisdiction concerning your particular situation. Review of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.